Arctic Moto Challenge 2016

For 2016, I’ll be taking on a new Moto Challenge – 9,500km miles in July 2016.

2000px-Arctic_circle.svg
The Route will be leaving from the North West of England, traveling to the Netherlands by ferry then by road through Germany, Denmark, Norway and into the Arctic Circle. (and back again!) I have made some modifications to the bike to cope with the differing climate conditions where temperatures can rise and fall in excess of 20-30 degrees over the course of day and night. I’ll be traveling approximately 10 hours & 400 miles per day which means making sure I’m in good shape, so I’ve been training over the winter months using a Motocross bike to strengthen up and improve endurance !

IMG_7513 [3608]

The Arctic Moto Challenge is one I’ve been looking forward to for a long time and the riding experience gained from last years  Pyrenees Moto Challenge will be invaluable. Rough terrain, potential mechanical faults and the unrelenting schedule will become a mental as well as physical challenge.  As usual, I’ll be camping along the way and will have to factor in regular fuel stops using GPS mapping as useful guide.

General Plan
 

Both Norway and Sweden are massively long countries, getting to the arctic circle and back in 2 weeks will be a challenge in itself with long days to begin with and sleeping on ferries to get there. Up to arctic circle via fastest route – motorway and fast A road
Return via Norway doing all the good bits, and there are lots of good bits!

Depart Fri night (subject to ferries) return 2 weeks on Sun.

Looking at Fri July 15th ferry from Hull in the evening return to Hull Sun 31st July 2016.

It’s no secret that the curving mountainside roads of Norway create some of Europe’s greatest motorcycling experiences.

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Summary of organised tour
http://mcitours.co.uk/S15/2/Norway-Arctic-Circle.html
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Tour Highlights
North Cape
Nordkapp the Highest Road in Europe – Yes
Trollstigen Pass / Trolls Ladder  –  Yes No 5 in top biking roads
Pulipt Rock –
Atlantic Coast Road
Arctic Circle
Norway Fjords
Lillehammer

Norway is a fantastic country to ride. Policing of roads is less conspicuous than the UK, however there are speed cameras and radar traps – particularly around the main settlement areas. Speed offence enforcement when it occurs is not to be taken lightly, with heavy fines and on the spot payments demanded to the point you will be escorted to a cash point! At the present time, speeding offences will not result in points on your license.

There are toll roads in Norway – particularly on bridges and tunnels in the fjord areas.
http://www.bikersadvice.com/articles/travel/touring-by-bike-in-sweden-norway/

Ferries

The return trip to Denmark ferries  from
  1. Hirtshals to Kristiansand, (2hrs 15mins)
  2. Hirtshals to Stavanger (10hrs 30mins)
  3. Hirtshals to Bergen (16hrs)
  4. Hirtshals to Larvik.

The most commonly used and direct routes to Sweden and Norway are:
Newcastle – Kristiansand – Gothenburg- Was run by DFDS but is no longer in service

Twice weekly
Newcastle – Stavanger – Haugesund – Bergen / Bergen – Haugesund – Stavanger – Newcastle – (Fjord Line)
Twice weekly

Dover – Calais Crossing – £49 / £60 return with motorbike
Harwich to Hook of Holland – £135 return with motorbike there is one departing 11pm Fri night. Hull to Rotterdam

Denmark to Norway Ferry – use this in reverse for home leg
Hirtshals (Denmark) to Kristiansand (Norway)

Bikes
PO12ZXZ – Paul XT660Z
PF63LNY – Matt XT1200Z
PK60HUZ  – Tom XT660Z

Ferry Booking
HULL TO ROTTERDAM   Friday 15/07/2016  20:30
Hull: King George Dock, Hedon Road, Kingston upon Hull, HU9 5PS (Terminal 1); HU9 5PR (Terminal 2)

ROTTERDAM TO HULL 30/07/2016 DEPART 20:30 ARRIVE 11:00 Sunday 31st July
Europoort: Luxembourg Weg No.2, 3198 LG Europoort, Netherlands

Route

Day 1 .0
Friday 15th July
Macclesfield to Hull (Ferry to Rotterdam) (184km) cumulative (184km)
Hull Depart: Fri 15 Jul @ 20:30
Rotterdam Arrive: Sat 16 Jul @ 09:00
P&O £161.50

Day 2.1 
Saturday 16th July

Hull to Rotterdam Ferry to Puttgarden-Rodby Ferry = 421 Miles

Rotterdam to Copenhagen = 512 Miles
(Stay in Copenhagen) £78 for all 3 of us = £23 each! with a Car Park 0.7 miles from City Centre

 Ferry: Puttgarden to Rodby ferry. Every 30 minutes. Running 24/7. £34 One Way

 

Day 2.2
Saturday 16th July = 99 Miles
Rodby-Puttgarden Ferry to Cab Inn Express Hotel =

Day 3
Sunday 17th July
Copenhagen to Stockholm = 408 Miles
(Stay in Stockholm City) £61 for all 3 of us including Breakfast = £20each! With Car Park 0.9 miles from City Centre

Day 4
Monday 18th July
Stockholm to Umea = 395 Miles
(Stay in Umea City) 
Nice Hotel with Parking (Hotel Pilen)  0.7miles from city £105 = £35 Each

Day 5
Tuesday 19th July
Umea to Hetta (Finland) = 405 Miles
Ounasloma Luxury CottagesMint Cottage with Sauna  £64 for 3 = £21.30 Each

Day 6
Wednesday 20th July
Umea to Nordkapp = 296 Miles
Nordkapp Vandrerhjem Hostel £74 = £24.60 each Free Indoor Motorcycle Parking
or Nordkapp Caravan & Camping

Day 7
Thursday 21st July
Nordkapp to Tromsø = 315 miles
Huts w/o bathroom £55 = £18 each

Day 8.0
Friday 22nd July

Tromsø to Skaberget Ferry = 203 miles
Day 8.1
Friday 22nd July
Bognes Ferry to Fauske Camping = 104 miles

Day 9
Saturday 23rd July

Fauske Camping to Soria Moria Camping. 349 miles
Biker camping

Day 10
Sunday 24th July
Soria Moria Camping to Molde = 286 miles (via Atlantic Highway)

Day 11
Monday 25th July
Kviltor Camping to Volsdalen Camping (Alesund) = 231 Miles


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Day 12.0 (270 miles Total)
Tuesday 26th July
Volsdalen Camping to Linge-Eidsdal Rv63 ferry = 48 Miles
 Day 12.1
Tuesday 26th July
Linge-Eidsdal Rv63 ferry to Flåm Camping = 222 Miles (via Dalsnibba Viewpoint and Stegastein- LOOKOUT)

Day 13.0 (222.3 miles Total)
Wednesday 27th July
Flåm Camping to Ferry / Tunnel / Bridge = 47 miles

Day 13.1
Wednesday 27th July
Ferry / Tunnel / Bridge to Trolltunga = 40.3 + Hike to Trolltunga 22 km 4-8 hours!!!
Trolltunga is one of the most spectacular scenic cliffs in Norway. Trolltunga is situated about 1100 meters above sea level, hovering 700 metres above lake Ringedalsvatnet. The view is breathtaking. The hike starts in Skjeggedal and goes through the high mountains, takes 10-12 hours (22 km in total to Trolltunga and return) and the ascent is about 900 meters. It is a long and hard hike. The hike is usually possible to do from mid-June, depending on when the snow melts in the mountains. Normally one can hike to Trolltunga until mid-September. Consider carefully whether you are in good enough shape and have the right equipment before setting out. There is no mobile phone coverage along the route. Drive to Tyssedal (6 km from Odda) on route 13. Follow signs to Skjeggedal and Trolltunga. After about 7 km you reach the parking place in Skjeggedal. Parking in Skjeggedal or Tyssedal. Parking fee NOK 120 pr. day (2015).
The parking fee is used to finance public facilities in the area.


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Trolltunga
Trolltunga (Troll’s tongue) is a piece of rock jutting horizontally out of a mountain about 700 metres (2,300 ft) above the north side of the lake Ringedalsvatnet in the municipality of Odda in Hordaland county, Norway. The cliff is located east of the Skjeggedal area, about 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) east of the village of Tyssedal and the Sørfjorden (a branch off of the main Hardanger Fjord). The name translated to English is The Troll’s tongue.
GPS position 60°07′51″N 6°45′15″E
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trolltunga

The name means the Kjerag Bolt – a massive 5 m³ boulder wedged in to a crevasse on the edge of the Kjerag mountain in Lysefjorden, Norway. Without the help of any mountaineering equipment, brave visitors can walk on to the bolt – it is said to bring good luck. 12 km out and back hike with 500 meters of climbing.
http://www.kuriositas.com/2011/12/would-you-stand-on-kjeragbolten.html

Day 13.2
Wednesday 27th July
Trolltunda end of road to Sand-Ropeid/Rv46 ferry = 77 Miles
Day 13.3
Wednesday 27th July
Sand-Ropeid/Rv46 ferry to Nesvik-Hjelmeland/Rv13 ferry = 27 Miles
Day 13.4
Wednesday 27th July
Nesvik-Hjelmeland/Rv13 ferry to Preikestolen camping = 31 miles
Day 14.0
Thursday 28th July
Preikestolen Camping to Pulpit Rock Parking – 2.6 Miles + 8.5km Hike (3.5 hours)
Pulpit rock


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GPS position N58 59.515 E6 08.280 parking
The Pulpit Rock – One of Norway’s most popular hikesskrevet av Kjell Arild Nummedal tir, 26/05/2015 – 19:54. The Pulpit Rock is a well-known hiking destination, not only in Norway, but also in large parts of the rest of the world. It’s expected that as many as 200,000 will find their way to Strand and Forsand to climb this majestic rock formation. The trail has recently been upgraded by Nepalese Sherpa stonemasons. There is a majestic view over Lysefjorden from the plateau of the Pulpit Rock.
Allow 3.5 hours for the round trip, total length 8.5 km.

Trail length: 8.5 km round trip
Trail markings: Red Ts and signs
Terrain: Trail (good footwear is necessary, hiking boots or trekking shoes)
Effort level: Medium
Height: 604 meters above sea level

Parking:

There are several ways to get to the parking by Preikestolen Fjellstue. (The Pulpit Rock Lodge) We drove to Lauvik and took the ferry to Oanes. The municipalities of Sandnes and Forsand meet mid-fjord. Follow the E13 road, “Ryfylkeveien,” towards Jørpeland. You will see the sign for the Pulpit Rock before you get to Jørpeland. Turn on to Rv529 and follow the road to the top, about 5 km from the intersection. In season there are attendants by the parking lot entrance for guests and hikers. The price for parking is 100 NOK (year 2014). Coins or credit card may be used for paying. GPS position N58 59.515 E6 08.280.
Day 14.1
Thursday 28th July
Pulpit Rock Parking – Pulpit Rock Parking to Songesand – Lysebotn Ferry = 36.9 Miles + 1hr 13min on ferry
Day 14.2
Thursday 28th July
Lysebotn – Songesand Ferry to Kjerag Restaurant (Kjeragbolten) = 5 Miles + 8km hike

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Lysebotnveien, Lysefjorden, Norway (No 13)


In southern Norway, Lyseboth Road in Lysefjorden has more twists than the wildest roller coaster, with more than 30 sharp hairpin bends, switchbacks and a dark tunnel with a surprise bend concealed within it, which will definitely get your adrenaline pumping. (Road Rv986 and the Fv500)
When you’ve finally calmed down again, you can eat your lunch on the pier at the end of the fjord, and watch the ferries snailing up along the waterscape, collecting the people that don’t feel like taking the road back up the hill again.
Check out Øygårdsstolan at the top of the road, giving great views along the fjord, or even take the 3-hour trek up to Preikestolen (Pulpit Rock)
Norway – Would You Stand on The Kjeragbolten?


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Day 14.3
Thursday 28th July
Kjerag Restaurant to Ferry to Denmark = 134 Miles
Possible Times for ferries Day 14.3
Hirtshals – Kristiansand : Fjord Line
Hirtshals
Kristiansand
Depart: Fri 29 Jul @ 17:00
Arrive: Fri 29 Jul @ 19:15
02h 15m
Hirtshals – Kristiansand : Color Line
Hirtshals -Kristiansand
Depart: Fri 29 Jul @ 20:45
Arrive: Fri 29 Jul @ 23:59
03h 14m
(2 days to get back to Rotterdam)
Day 15
Friday 29th July
Hirtshals Camping to Camping Buchholz = 317 Miles
 Stay in Hamburg lots of campsites.
Day 16

Saturday 30th July
Camping Buchholz to Hull to Rotterdam Ferry = 331 Miles

ROTTERDAM TO HULL 30/07/2016 DEPART 20:30 ARRIVE 11:00 Sunday 31st July
Europoort: Luxembourg Weg No.2, 3198 LG Europoort, Netherlands

Kit Notes
Bug spray / mossie net – the bugs in Norway can be as bad as in Scotland
Rain over suit. Waterproof holder for phone to charge while riding
Trekking Trainers – there are a few mountains to climb
Fuel
Service stations, how are they spaced in Norway? Will I need an additional fuel tank?
Everywhere, use a satnav you’ll never be too far from one, most stations are unmanned so you’ll need a visa with pin, my German euro card EC were not recognised

Avoid filling in Uno X gas stations – bikers have had problems with poor fuel / contamination

Camping card saves you having to leave your passport at any campsite reception, as the card holds your details. Widely accepted all over Scandinavia.

Minutes of a Motorcycle Addict
http://www.mc-addict.com/budgettravelinnorway.htm
Learn how to travel in Norway the inexpensive way

“tusen takk” (thank you)
“får jeg spandere en øl?” (can I buy you a beer?)

Map of things to see in Norway:
http://www.visitnorway.com/uk/vn/map/?aid=8925&articlex=null&articley=null&source=arti

Roads / Places to include in the routeThe numbers in brackets are the ref to the top 100 motorcycle roads in Europe
Trollstigen, – Norway (No 5) – On Garmin


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The National Tourist Road Geiranger – Trollstigen (The Ladder of the Trolls) is a stretch of road of 106 kilometers between Lake Langvatnet in Strynefjell and Sogge bridge in Romsdal in  the Norwegian Fjords

Trollstigen – ‘the troll’s ladder’ Trollstigen is a very motorbike-friendly mountain road in Rauma, Norway, part of Norwegian National Road 63 connecting Soggeberget in Rauma and Valldal in Norddal. – climbs through the steep slopes and intense natural landscape of western Norway. Located about 15 kilometres south of Andalsnes, in the province of More og Romsdal, north of the Norwegian fjords,  It has a steep incline of 9% and eleven hairpin bends up a steep mountain side. Trollstigen was opened on July 31, 1936, by King Haakon VII after 8 years of construction. The road up is narrow with many sharp hairpins, and although it has been widened in recent years, vehicles over 12.4 metres long are prohibited from driving the road.There is a parking area at the top, and a ten minute walk will take you a viewing point looking out over the overlooks the road, with all its bends and the Stigfossen waterfall, which falls 320 metres down to the enchanting valley of Isterdalen.

Trollstigen is closed during the Autumn and Winter months, and a normal opening season stretches from mid-May to October, but may sometimes be shorter or longer due to changes in the weather conditions. You have to ride this road, just remember to time it right!

Atlantic Road, Norway (No 40) – On Garmin

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The Atlantic Road is a 8km stretch of road between the towns of  Molde(in the south) and Kristiansund (north) and, the two main population centres in the county of Møre og Romsdal in Fjord Norway.

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Road 64 starts 47 kilometres north of Molde and ends approximately 30 kilometres southwest of Kristiansund

In winter storms, the ‘Hustadvika’ stretch of ocean really becomes dramatic and wild. You don’t want to have to take your bike across the Storseisundet Bridge at that time of year, but in Summer, it’s an unbelievable blend of nature, engineering, landscape and seascape. The Atlantic Road has been awarded the status national tourist route because of the architecture of the road and the bridges, and the incredible coastline it passes through. You can easily find yourself repeatedly taking this road from both directions, all day long, until you get tired. Then you take the Atlantic Ocean Tunnel up to the town of Kristiansund, for a very expensive evening beer.

Jotunheimen National Park, Norway (No 30)

Full route starts at Kaupanger & heads north on the RV55 (Riksvel 55)
Mid Point is Gaupne with camp site after the bridge

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Ends at Lom

Jotunheimen National Park in Southern Norway, covers an area of roughly 3,500 square kilometres, and includes Norway’s highest mountain Galdhøpiggen, as well as spectacular waterfalls, rivers, lakes, glaciers and beautiful valleys. Jotunheimen is also home to a range of different animals, from Reindeer, elk, deer, roe, fox, marten, mink, to wolverines and lynx. Camping here can be a bit of a gamble, as either a fox or an elk can stumble across your tent in the night, but in our case, it was a herd of loud, bearded Norwegian mountain goats, that got tangled in the tent lines. Lucky break.

Narvik to Skutvik, Norway (No 44)

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Narvik, one of the most northerly towns in the world, is located on the shores of the Narvik Fjord, in the Ofoten traditional region of North Norway, inside the arctic circle. This means you have to choose your time of year wisely, unless you have a heated, full body arctic suit, and a snowplough mounted on your motorbike. The history of Narvik as a settlement began in the Stone Age, and not very much is known about these people, but the Vikings lived in this area. The port of Narvik proved to be strategically valuable in the early years of World War II and the town became a focal point of the Norwegian campaign.

Svolvær to Moskenes Norway (No 50)
Svolvær is located in Lofoten on the south coast of Austvågøy, facing the open sea to the south, and with mountains immediately to the north. There is also a well known and very interesting World War II museum in Svolvær (Lofoten Krigsminnemuseum), which is worth checking out. At the end of the trip, Moskenes is among the most scenic municipalities in all Norway, and the picturesque fishing villages of Hamnøy, Reine, Sørvågen, Moskenes, Å, and Tind have a dramatic backdrop of jagged peaks rising above the Vestfjord. A dream landscape for motorbiking, you can find whatever you’re looking for here.

Bergen to Nautnes, Norway (No 57)
Ride west out of Bergen, and up through Øygarden, and watch the space-landscape unfold before your eyes. Especially beautiful in the evening twilight, if you can catch the sunset on your left, and you ride northwards across the many islands that comprise this fantastic trip, held together by a series of bridges and causeways, as if trying to stop them floating out into the North Sea. Find a place to set up camp close to the water’s edge, light a campfire, break out the beers, and soak in the sunset, knowing you can look forward to having to ride the road in the other direction, in the morning. Next day, check out the WWII Atlantic Wall Coastal Battery at the Fjell Fortress, on the way back to Bergen. Great view from the top.

Geiranger into Bergen, Norway (No 68)
Since 2005, the Geirangerfjord has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and has been named the best travel destination in Scandinavia by Lonely Planet. Geiranger is a small tourist village in Sunnmøre in the municipality of Stranda in Møre og Romsdal county, in the western part of Norway. It lies at the head of the Geirangerfjord, which is a branch of the Storfjord. The nearest city is Ålesund. Geiranger is home to some of the most spectacular scenery in the world, with The Seven Sisters waterfall is located just west of Geiranger. (Route E39)

Probably best done in a couple of days, to better appreciate the mind-blowing scenery. Head north out of Bergen on the E39, and soon you’ll be rolling your bike on and off the ferries that act as floating bridges across the myriad fjords. All around is a landscape of drowned glacial valleys, with sheer 1,000m cliffs plunging into inky depths. Cross the Sognefjorden, Norway’s longest and deepest fjord, then continue past glaciers and through tunnels that go on for miles, until you arrive above the Unesco-listed Geirangerfjord, a vast axe-wound of a fjord. Make your way down the Trollstigen, an intestinal tract of road that zigzags down to the water and put your bike on the ferry that plies the Geirangerfjord, watching in awe as you slide past the giant foaming slashes of the Seven Sisters and Bridal Veil waterfalls

Hardangerveien, Norway (No 75)
A great road for motorbikes, the road along the Hardangerfjord in Norway bring you along the third largest fjord in the world and the second largest in Norway (179 km).

The Hardangerfjord starts at the Atlantic Ocean just south of Bergen. Here the fjord penetrates in a north easterly direction until it meets the grand mountain plateau of Hardangervidda. The longest branch of the Hardangerfjord is Sørfjorden which cuts south about 50 km from the main fjord. Its maximum depth is more than 800m just outside Norheimsund in the middle of the fjord.

The history of the fjord goes far beyond its Viking past, back to the time of hunters on the surrounding mountains, and later on, farming along this fertile area which today is considered the fruit orchard of Norway. (Route E16)

The National Tourist Road Geiranger – Trollstigen (The Ladder of the Trolls) is a stretch of road of 106 kilometers between Lake Langvatnet in Strynefjell and Sogge bridge in Romsdal in  the Norwegian Fjords

Trollstigen – ‘the troll’s ladder’ Trollstigen is a very motorbike-friendly mountain road in Rauma, Norway, part of Norwegian National Road 63 connecting Soggeberget in Rauma and Valldal in Norddal. – climbs through the steep slopes and intense natural landscape of western Norway. Located about 15 kilometres south of Andalsnes, in the province of More og Romsdal, north of the Norwegian fjords,  It has a steep incline of 9% and eleven hairpin bends up a steep mountain side. Trollstigen was opened on July 31, 1936, by King Haakon VII after 8 years of construction. The road up is narrow with many sharp hairpins, and although it has been widened in recent years, vehicles over 12.4 metres long are prohibited from driving the road.There is a parking area at the top, and a ten minute walk will take you a viewing point looking out over the overlooks the road, with all its bends and the Stigfossen waterfall, which falls 320 metres down to the enchanting valley of Isterdalen.

Trollstigen is closed during the Autumn and Winter months, and a normal opening season stretches from mid-May to October, but may sometimes be shorter or longer due to changes in the weather conditions. You have to ride this road, just remember to time it right!

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Norway – Would You Stand on The Kjeragbolten?

Trolltunga
Trolltunga (Troll’s tongue) is a piece of rock jutting horizontally out of a mountain about 700 metres (2,300 ft) above the north side of the lake Ringedalsvatnet in the municipality of Odda in Hordaland county,Norway.
The cliff is located east of the Skjeggedal area, about 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) east of the village of Tyssedal and the Sørfjorden (a branch off of the main Hardanger Fjord). The name translated to English is The Troll’s tongue.
GPS position 60°07′51″N 6°45′15″E
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trolltunga
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 The Troll Tongue is available for hikers from approximately mid-June to mid-September. It is located 17 kilometres from city centre in OddaHordaland, a county in Western Norway. The city of Bergen, the second largest in Norway, is located about 190 kilometres from the site via main roads. To reach the trail from national road 13, turn eastward in Tyssedalen away from the fjord up towards Hardangervidda, and drive the narrow but good road about 7 km up Skjeggedal. The road to the site ends at a parking facility near the dam at the end of Ringedalsvatnet 443 meters above sea level. There is a car park where Mågelibanen (a trolley car) started, though it is no longer in operation. The path up to Måglitoppen begin on the right of the cart path on the stairwell. There is a steep trail that rises about 410 meters up the first 1.5 kilometers up to the Måglitopp. Here the track surfaces slightly out before raising up Gryteskaret, another 330 meters to the highest point on the first part of the route 4 kilometers from the startingpoint, at Trombåskaret (1183 meters above sealevel).[2] The next section slopes down towards Store Floren, getting sight of the drop towards the valley floor containing Ringedalsvatnet and an increasing number of glimpses by the Folgefonna glacier in the west. The area has typical mountain vegetation of small plants and flowers. Here there are masonry remains after a stable for horses used by plant construction operations for power development in the early 1900s. Further along the track continues over Hesteflåene and the dried out river Endåno. In this area there are traces of prior construction activities. The path continues steeply up to Endanuten, the highest part (being 1214 meters above sea level) and crosses the dried river to Tyssestrengene. This was a twin waterfall of 300 meters free fall, which would have been Norway’s highest. These two waterfalls were built over and placed in tubes in 1967. It is possible to take a detour to the edge and look down towards Ringedalsvatnet. The path goes on past glacial potholes, then continues past Tysshøl, and finally approaches Trolltunga.


There are other significant geological features and settlements around Ringedalsvatnet.
The hike in the mountains to Trolltunga is an 8-10 hour walk in total, about 22 kilometers, with a height difference of about 900 meters. Popularity of the trail and rock formations has increased in recent years, with up to 500 visitors a day.[1][2][3][4]
A U.S. internet magazine listed this place as number one in the world where an impressive selfie can be taken.[5][6]

Tronfjell top, in Alvdal. It’s a gravel road with an awsome view


Recommended by a biker from Norway
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpneA58MalM

Top Tips

Other Person Road Trip in the South
http://www.ebbo.org/norway1.php

Planning links
http://www.xplorebritain.com/dfds-fe…ise-norway.asp
http://www.colorline.com/servlets/page?section=4000
http://www.visitnorway.no/
http://www.visitsorlandet.com/Region…S/Default.aspx
http://www.sorlandet.com/index.php?e…121&menuid=121
http://www.sorlandet.com/index.php?m…100&expand=100
http://www.nordsjovegen.no/Default.aspx?tabid=1677
http://www.reisemal-sydvest.no/
http://www.reisemal-sydvest.no/norsk…r/bakkaano.htm (sokndal camping)
http://www.regionstavanger.com/?sp=GB
http://www.fjordnorway.com/Default.a…&subtabid=1302
http://ny.suleskarvegen.no/index.php…on=vis&type=12
http://ny.suleskarvegen.no/index.php…ion=vis&type=7

Weather
http://www.wunderground.com/global/stations/01052.html
http://met.no/english/index.html

Camping Locations Web Site
Norway
https://www.norcamp.de/en/norway.camping.map.0.html

“Everymans right” to camp where they want, the restriction are more than 100m from a residence, no off road driving. keep an eye out for Cabins (hytte) you’ll need to dry off at some stage they are worth it start about 350NK I found one for 200NK (£20)

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1. July or August?
Both warm (& wet) the midnight sun starts to set end of July but you have to in the far north to see it)

The plan is to take the ferry from Hirsthals (Denmark) to Kristiansand and go west/north along the coast until we hit Bergen and move inland from there.
Stay closer to the coast and the fjord lands, regardless of where you go you’ll love it. keep an eye on your POI on the satnav Points of high tourist value are marked by roadsigns too,

5. We don’t have enough time to do Nordkapp (not at a leisurely pace anyway) so any tips on sights to see, places to go, people to have a beer with? Beer is very very expensive, does not stop them having a good piss-up mind you, if you get chance and time go up to Lafoten area, stunning does not do it justice, to save money go to Supermarkets the big ones have Hot Deli counters and free coffee for customers.